Spatial and temporal relationships of electrocorticographic alpha and gamma activity during auditory processing.

TitleSpatial and temporal relationships of electrocorticographic alpha and gamma activity during auditory processing.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2014
AuthorsPotes, C, Brunner, P, Gunduz, A, Knight, RT, Schalk, G
JournalNeuroimage
Volume97
Pagination188-95
Date Published08/2014
ISSN1095-9572
KeywordsAcoustic Stimulation, Adolescent, Adult, Alpha Rhythm, Auditory Perception, Brain Mapping, Causality, Electroencephalography, Epilepsy, Female, Gamma Rhythm, Humans, Individuality, Male, Middle Aged, Music, Young Adult
Abstract

Neuroimaging approaches have implicated multiple brain sites in musical perception, including the posterior part of the superior temporal gyrus and adjacent perisylvian areas. However, the detailed spatial and temporal relationship of neural signals that support auditory processing is largely unknown. In this study, we applied a novel inter-subject analysis approach to electrophysiological signals recorded from the surface of the brain (electrocorticography (ECoG)) in ten human subjects. This approach allowed us to reliably identify those ECoG features that were related to the processing of a complex auditory stimulus (i.e., continuous piece of music) and to investigate their spatial, temporal, and causal relationships. Our results identified stimulus-related modulations in the alpha (8-12 Hz) and high gamma (70-110 Hz) bands at neuroanatomical locations implicated in auditory processing. Specifically, we identified stimulus-related ECoG modulations in the alpha band in areas adjacent to primary auditory cortex, which are known to receive afferent auditory projections from the thalamus (80 of a total of 15,107 tested sites). In contrast, we identified stimulus-related ECoG modulations in the high gamma band not only in areas close to primary auditory cortex but also in other perisylvian areas known to be involved in higher-order auditory processing, and in superior premotor cortex (412/15,107 sites). Across all implicated areas, modulations in the high gamma band preceded those in the alpha band by 280 ms, and activity in the high gamma band causally predicted alpha activity, but not vice versa (Granger causality, p

URLhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24768933
DOI10.1016/j.neuroimage.2014.04.045
Alternate JournalNeuroimage
PubMed ID24768933
PubMed Central IDPMC4065821
Grant ListEB000856 / EB / NIBIB NIH HHS / United States
EB006356 / EB / NIBIB NIH HHS / United States
NS21135 / NS / NINDS NIH HHS / United States
R01 EB000856 / EB / NIBIB NIH HHS / United States
R01 EB006356 / EB / NIBIB NIH HHS / United States
R37 NS021135 / NS / NINDS NIH HHS / United States
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